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Redesigning the power grid is no job for the faint of heart

Utilities make money by building more equipment and selling more electricity, but the amount of electricity used in New England is largely unchanged since 2005 even as the economy has grown. Such changes have led many to hope that our supply of electricity could become cleaner, more resilient and cheaper, and have led to other fears that it will become erratic, unreliable and more expensive.

Figuring out how to live up to the hopes rather than living down to the fears is driving the discussion.

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Digital ‘right-to-repair’ law may – that’s may – come to New Hampshire

Digital ‘right-to-repair’ law may – that’s may – come to New Hampshire

A “digital electronic product repair” bill will be considered by the Legislature this year. It would require companies to do such things as provide device buyers and third-party shops with diagnostic and repair information – stuff that used to be included in instruction manuals – and also provide updates of firmware that is embedded in devices. Basically, the proposed legislation wants to keep manufacturers from doing anything that unreasonably gets in the way of you, me or an independent repair shop from fixing or tinkering with a device after it has been paid for.

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About Granite Geek

Dave Brooks has written a science/tech column since 1991 - yes, that long - and has written this blog since 2006, keeping an eye on topics of geekish interest in and around New Hampshire, from software to sea level rise, population dynamics to printing (3-D, of course). He moderates monthly Science Cafe NH discussions, beer in hand, and discusses the geek world regularly on New Hampshire Public Radio.

Brooks earned a bachelor's degree in mathematics but got lost on the way to the Ivory Tower and ended up in a newsroom. He has reported for newspapers from Tennessee to New England. Rummage through his bag of awards you'll find oddities like three Best Blog prizes from the New Hampshire Press Association and a Writer of the Year award from the N.H. Farm and Forest Bureau, of all places. He joined the Concord Monitor in 2015.

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