Software helps spot violent terrorism-recruiting videos online, says Dartmouth professor

I’ve written about Dartmouth professor Hany Farid a few times over the past decade and a bit because of his interesting work using software to detect manipulation of digital photos, including a company called Fourandsix (“forensics” – get it?) that does photo authentication. Now he’s involved with a project called the Counter Extremism Project that develops … Read more Software helps spot violent terrorism-recruiting videos online, says Dartmouth professor

Recent patents filed in New Hampshire

By Targeted News Service: Recent patents filed by individuals or companies in New Hampshire include: GTAT of Merrimack has been assigned a patent (9,369,553) developed by two co-inventors for a “mobile electronic device comprising an ultrathin sapphire cover plate.” The co-inventors are James Zahler of Winchester, Mass., and Christopher Petti of Mountain View, Calif. The … Read more Recent patents filed in New Hampshire

‘Uber for chores’ startup is NH’s first try at equity crowdfunding

A small startup in Peterborough called QaZing (they spell it qaZING but I have my capitalization standards) that connects people with assistants in an Uber-like fashion is the only company in New Hampshire that so far is trying to raise money through the new equity crowdfunding system, which is sort of a cross between Kickstarter and angel investing. You … Read more ‘Uber for chores’ startup is NH’s first try at equity crowdfunding

Don’t toss those oyster shells – or, rather, toss them in Great Bay

Hundreds and hundreds of pounds of old oyster shells are collected from restaurants around New Hampshire each week and eventually placed into Great Bay, the huge tidal estuary that swings west of Portsmouth, to create a substrate for new oysters to grow. It’s part of an overall effort to return this filter-feeding and tasty bivalve … Read more Don’t toss those oyster shells – or, rather, toss them in Great Bay

In Maine, they’re hunting for a lost, historic sundial (yes, sundial)

The Portland Press-Herald has an interesting story today about a hunt in that city for a lost sundial of unusual design: They were not looking for just any sundial, but a new and improved version patented by scientist and inventor Albert Cushing Crehore in 1905. Unlike a traditional sundial, with a flat dial and an … Read more In Maine, they’re hunting for a lost, historic sundial (yes, sundial)

Doctors, like astronomers, are leery about outdoor LED lights

I wrote this week about how astronomers aren’t crazy about outdoor LED lights because they are more effective than sodium or incandescent light at interfering with our night vision. Doctors have some of the same concerns, as CNN reports in this good piece. Doctors are worried that blue/white LED lights more harshly affect drivers and … Read more Doctors, like astronomers, are leery about outdoor LED lights

Alternative (“complementary”) medicine is big business: $30 billion a year in U.S.

A new report from the National Health Statistics, based on  a 2012 national survey, reflects what a massive business alternative/complementary medicine has become in the U.S.: An estimated 59 million persons aged 4 years and over had at least one expenditure for some type of complementary health approach, resulting in total outof-pocket expenditures of $30.2 … Read more Alternative (“complementary”) medicine is big business: $30 billion a year in U.S.

LEDs are awesome … unless you want to look at the stars

  We’re all familiar with the phrase “It’s an ill wind that blows no good,” the optimistic belief that you can find silver linings in all but the worst of events. Unfortunately, the less-cheerful antithesis – “It’s a rare wind that blows no ill” – is also true: You can find unintended downsides in all but the very best of events. Today’s … Read more LEDs are awesome … unless you want to look at the stars

I got to use the word ‘sinusoidal’ in a story – and it’s about rumble strips

Rumble strips, those patterns of grooves cut into the side of or center trip of roads to alert drivers wandering out of their lanes, aren’t exactly exciting technology. Or so I thought before writing a story about them for the Monitor this weekend, which includes my favorite newly learned term: Sinusoidal rumble strips, which have a sine-wave-like … Read more I got to use the word ‘sinusoidal’ in a story – and it’s about rumble strips

As ticks thrive in warmer winters, moose get sicker and sicker

New Hampshire is celebrating the lottery for its annual moose hunt, but I suspect there soon won’t be any hunt because we won’t have enough moose: The mortality rate of moose calves in New Hampshire this winter was a staggering 80 percent, due mostly to a warm winter allowing more ticks to thrive. The Union-Leader has the … Read more As ticks thrive in warmer winters, moose get sicker and sicker