Select Page
Take *that*, expensive textbooks!

Take *that*, expensive textbooks!

It's been a very long time since I was in college - cue jokes about papyrus scrolls and how math class was easier then because only 8 numerals had been invented - but I still remember how annoying it was to shell out big bucks for the "new edition" of Paul Samuelson's...

read more

The ocean is coming – what should we do?

New Hampshire has the shortest coastline of any state bordering an ocean but it's still long enough and has enough development that sea-level rise and erratic storm surges will cause gazillions of dollars in damage down the road. So what should we do? A new report has...

read more

The lowly culvert can be exciting

I've long been fascinated by culverts, those zillions of pipes that carry small waterways under roads - writing about them (e.g., here) so much that one editor at the Monitor makes jokes about my passion. Culverts interesting because they're a perfect example of...

read more
That’s what a flat roof should look like

That’s what a flat roof should look like

The day has long gone when "building unveils solar array" is much in the way of news - but I'll make an exception for Dover High School, which installed a rooftop array so big that it increases the state's (admittedly small) solar capacity by 1.5%. You can see the...

read more

About Granite Geek

Dave Brooks has written a science/tech column since 1991 – yes, that long – and has written this blog since 2006, keeping an eye on topics of geekish interest in and around New Hampshire, from software to sea level rise, population dynamics to printing (3-D, of course). He moderates monthly Science Cafe NH discussions, beer in hand, and discusses the geek world regularly on WKXL radio in Concord.

Brooks earned a bachelor’s degree in mathematics but got lost on the way to the Ivory Tower and ended up in a newsroom. He has reported for newspapers from Tennessee to New England. Rummage through his bag of awards you’ll find oddities like three Best Blog prizes from the New Hampshire Press Association and a Writer of the Year award from the N.H. Farm and Forest Bureau, of all places. He joined the Concord Monitor in 2015.

Pin It on Pinterest